Focus on improving how nature is conserved and by whom instead of how much to protect.

Published online
20 Jan 2022
Published by
British Ecological Society
Content type
Miscellaneous
Website(s)
DOI
10.1002/pan3.10288

Author(s)
Dawson, N. & Carvalho, W. D. & Bezerra, J. S. S. & Todeschini, F. & Tabarelli, M. & Mustina, K.

Publication language
English
Location
Brazil

Abstract

This study focused on Catimbau National Park in the Caatinga dry forest of northeast Brazil. The study explored how the park was set up, and discussed with the communities who live there how they feel about the park and how they use, manage and are connected to the Caatinga. It was found that their lives closely bound to nature, not only because they use resources for food, medicine and more, but living in that place for generations has become their identity and involves a deep spiritual connection. Overall, this case shows that if new protected areas are created, they should involve and respect Indigenous and local communities' ways of living and let them apply their knowledge as part of any solution.

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