News and Opinion

Birds, bees and butter – new study underlines importance of biodiversity for crop production and West African livelihoods

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Birds, bees and butter – new study underlines importance of biodiversity for crop production and West African livelihoods

Shea trees are in important crop in Senegal and Uganda and they benefit from bees pollinating their flowers to produce fruit. New research finds that in sites with low tree and shrub diversity, fruit production is severely limited by a lack of pollination.

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Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds

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Lack of insects in cities limits breeding success of urban birds

Urban insect populations would need to increase by a factor of at least 2.5 for urban great tits to have same breeding success as those living in forests.

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How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?

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How does an increase in nitrogen application affect grasslands?

Researchers at the University of Bern share the first results of the largest biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiment in Switzerland

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Severe coral loss leaves reefs with larger fish but low energy turnover

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Severe coral loss leaves reefs with larger fish but low energy turnover

Research on the Great Barrier Reef has found severe coral loss to be associated with substantial increases in the size of large, long-living herbivorous fish. However, decreased recycling of this fish biomass could leave the ecosystem vulnerable to crashing.

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Wolf spiders may turn to cannibalism in a warming Arctic

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Wolf spiders may turn to cannibalism in a warming Arctic

Wolf spiders in a warming Arctic are getting bigger, reproducing more and eating different foods. Including other spiders.

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Nature reserve under water

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Nature reserve under water

Researchers present a new method for establishing protection zones for highly biodiverse deep sea areas.

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“Superfoods”, a super-impact on the environment

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“Superfoods”, a super-impact on the environment

Eating quinoa may not be as “eco-friendly” as you think: the environmental impact of “superfoods” under the spotlight.

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Understanding deer damage is crucial when planting new forests

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Understanding deer damage is crucial when planting new forests

Scientists at the University of Southampton and Forest Research say understanding the risk of damage by deer to new and existing forests in Britain is crucial when considering their expansion.

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Poor Amazonians go hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth

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Poor Amazonians go hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth

Poorer rural Amazonians are going hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse areas on the planet.

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British Ecological Society announces journal prize winners

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British Ecological Society announces journal prize winners

Today the British Ecological Society (BES) has announced the winners of its journal prizes for 2020. The prizes are awarded for the best paper by an early career researcher in six of the BES journals.

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Lizards develop new 'love language'

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Lizards develop new 'love language'

Animal chemical signals shift after only four generations.

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Ash dieback is less severe in isolated ash trees

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Ash dieback is less severe in isolated ash trees

New research finds that ash dieback is far less severe in the isolated conditions ash is often found in, such as forests with low ash density or in open canopies like hedges, suggesting the long term impact of the disease on Europe's ash trees will be more limited than previously thought.

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Parasite carried by grey squirrels negatively impacts red squirrel behaviour

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Parasite carried by grey squirrels negatively impacts red squirrel behaviour

Research reveals a new mechanism of how grey squirrels affect native red squirrels in Europe through parasite-mediated competition.

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West African lions show no preference between national parks and hunting zones

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West African lions show no preference between national parks and hunting zones

A University of Michigan-led study, believed to be the largest wildlife camera wildlife camera survey ever undertaken in West Africa, finds West African lions surprisingly show no preference between national parks and trophy-hunting areas.

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