Voice of the Future

Put your burning science policy questions to leading political figures.

Voice of the Future 2016 Royal Society of Biology

Voice of the Future offers young scientists the chance to put their burning science policy questions to key political figures, through a unique opportunity in Westminster. Please stay tuned for updates on when applications open for 2019.

Organised by the Royal Society of Biology on behalf of the science and engineering community, the annual event reverses the format of a Parliamentary Select Committee, giving a panel of early career scientists the opportunity to question senior figures from Parliament and Government on issues that matter to them.

Leading decision-makers that have appeared in front of the panel include the Minister of State for Universities, Science and Research, the Government’s Chief Scientific Adviser, and members of the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee. Find out more about previous events

Voice of the Future 2018 has now passed.

Criteria for the Selection of Participants

Broadly speaking, we are looking for younger scientists and engineers in their 20s or early 30s. Those who get to attend the event and sit at the ‘horseshoe’ will be not be identified individually, but by the name of their organisation.

When expressing an interest, please include your name, affiliation (e.g. PhD student, University of Brighton), email address, and your question.

Criteria for the Submission of Questions

There is no limit to the number of questions that you can submit. Please note, if you are selected to represent your organisation, you may not get to ask the exact question you submitted due to time restrictions and potential repetitions.

Questions should be broadly relevant to the people at whom they are directed, and remember the best questions are usually the most concise. Watch Voice of the Future 2018 to get an idea of the questions which were selected.

Read about Voice of the Future 2018 in our news and opinion section:

Voice of the Future 2017: